Contact Us

Use the form on the right to contact us.

You can edit the text in this area, and change where the contact form on the right submits to, by entering edit mode using the modes on the bottom right. 

         

123 Street Avenue, City Town, 99999

(123) 555-6789

email@address.com

 

You can set your address, phone number, email and site description in the settings tab.
Link to read me page with more information.

Good Reads

There, There by Tommy Orange

Lee Francis

9780525520375.jpeg

Tommy Orange’s “groundbreaking, extraordinary” (The New York TimesThere There is the “brilliant, propulsive” (People Magazine) story of twelve unforgettable characters, Urban Indians living in Oakland, California, who converge and collide on one fateful day. It’s “the year’s most galvanizing debut novel” (Entertainment Weekly).

Order HERE!

The Woman Who Married A Bear: Poems by Tiffany Midge

Lee Francis

FROM AMAZON:

"Winner of the Kenyon Review Earthworks Prize for Indigenous Poetry, Tiffany Midge deftly weaves Plains Indian myths into the present day and seeks to define love, the nature of desire, and identity in the twenty-first century. The book includes a series of poems, each titled "Considering Wakantanka," that connect the themes throughout the book. The Woman Who Married a Bear showcases the wholly individual voice of a talented poet."

ORDER HERE!

An Indigenous Peoples' History of the United States by Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz

Lee Francis

In An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States, Dunbar-Ortiz adroitly challenges the founding myth of the United States and shows how policy against the Indigenous peoples was colonialist and designed to seize the territories of the original inhabitants, displacing or eliminating them. And as Dunbar-Ortiz reveals, this policy was praised in popular culture, through writers like James Fenimore Cooper and Walt Whitman, and in the highest offices of government and the military. Shockingly, as the genocidal policy reached its zenith under President Andrew Jackson, its ruthlessness was best articulated by US Army general Thomas S. Jesup, who, in 1836, wrote of the Seminoles: “The country can be rid of them only by exterminating them.” 
 
Spanning more than four hundred years, this classic bottom-up peoples’ history radically reframes US history and explodes the silences that have haunted our national narrative.

Purchase the book HERE!